SEO + SEM + SMO = ROI

 

  • Analytics: Typically referring to Google Analytics specifically, though there are several different analytics softwares. Analytics refers to tracking software that provides statistics on your website’s usage, including how much traffic the site is getting, where the traffic is coming from, what keywords users are entering to reach your site, and much more.
  • B2B: Business to Business. B2B refers specifically to businesses that provide products or services to other businesses, as opposed to providing products or services to consumers. A company that manufactures forklifts to sell to other companies would be a B2B business.
  • B2C:Business to Consumer. B2C refers specifically to businesses that provide products or services to end users, or consumers, as opposed to providing them to other businesses. A company that manufactures toys told to consumers would be a B2C business.
  • Backlink: Backlinks refers to links from other websites that link to your website. Backlinks specifically exclude links from your own site that point to other places on your site. In general, the more backlinks you have, the more authority search engines will assume your site has. It is worth noting, however, that not all backlinks are equal and backlinks from generic directories that are not industry-specific can give no benefit at all.
  • Black Hat SEO: Black Hat SEO refers to SEO practices that are in violation of Google’s Webmaster Guidelines. Black Hat SEO attempts to manipulate their search engine rankings through means specifically and implicitly forbidden by Google. This can result in the sites being banned by Google, and no longer showing up in the search results of Google or its partners. Black Hat SEO marketers take this risk in hopes of getting fast results, typically on sites where it doesn’t matter if they get banned a month or two later. Sometimes also referred to as “algorithm chasers.” See our full Black Hat SEO article for details.
  • Bounce Rate: Bounce rate is an analytics term that refers to someone who visits just one page of a website, and then leaves. Bounce rate does not pay attention to how long they were on that page — it could be seconds or hours — but if they only looked at one page before leaving, it’s considered a bounce. While low bounce rates are desirable, a bounce is not necessarily a bad thing; it’s entirely possible the user found the information he or she was looking for on that page. See our SEO Basics article explaining bounce rates, including what is a good bounce rate and what you can learn from bounce rates.
  • Conversions: The term Conversions can have a couple of different meanings in the internet marketing world. Typically conversions refers to “converting” someone to goes to your website into a customer — meaning they actually made a purchase. Thus if 3,000 people visited your website, and 30 of them purchased anything, you’d have had 30 conversions. Conversions are not necessarily purchases though — often in the B2B world and the B2C services sector, there aren’t strictly defined products that customers can purchase from a shopping cart. In these cases conversions are often tracked as the number of people who filled out a request for quote or contact form.
  • CPA: Cost per Acquisition. A paid search engine advertising term meaning the total amount you’d have to pay to acquire a customer. Thus if you were paying $1 per click, and on average one out of 10 clickthroughs purchased from you, your CPA would be $10.  CPA is calculated as: CPC ÷ Conversion Rate.
  • CPC: Cost per Click. A paid search engine advertising term meaning the amount you have to pay each time a user clicks on one of your ad links. This is usually determined by bidding in an open market.
  • CPM: Cost per Thousand Impressions. A paid search engine advertising term meaning how much you would pay for 1,000 impressions of an ad. Once a common way of purchasing advertising online, now most online advertising is paid by clicks, rather than by impressions.
  • CTR: Click Through Rate. A term usually used with paid search engine advertising, but that can also apply to organic search engine optimization. CTR is the percentage of users who actually click on your ad. So if your ad was displayed 100 times, and 10 people clicked on it, you’d have a 10% click through rate. CTR is calculated as: # of clicks ÷ # of ad impressions
  • eCPM: Effective Cost per Thousand Impressions. A paid search engine advertising term meaning how much an ad that your site is displaying earns you, on average, every 1,000 times it’s viewed. eCPM is calculated as:  earnings (in dollars) ÷ impressions * 1,000.
  • Hits: A measure of traffic on your website. Every time a page is viewed, that is considered a hit. If the same person loads a page 8 times, that would count as 8 hits. Also referred to as pageviews.
  • Impressions: Similar to hits or pageviews, impressions is most commonly used as a paid search engine advertising term meaning the number of times that an ad appeared in search engine results, or as affiliated website ads, but can also refer to the number of times a webpage was viewed, making it synonymous with pageviews or hits.
  • Indexed Pages: Also used as Indexed Content. This refers to the pages on a website that a search engine has explored and stored. If a page, or site, has not been indexed by a search engine, there is no chance that it can show up in search engine results.
  • Keywords: Used throughout SEO in both organic and PPC, keywords refers to the actual words or phrase a user enters into a search engine. Websites and PPC campaigns are optimized around specific keywords.
  • Longtail: Frequently used as “longtail searches,” longtail refers to search phrases entered into a search engine the include certain keywords as well as a number of additional keywords. So if your site is optimized for “Tasty Apples” you might also rank for a longtail search of “Tasty Apples to Bake in Pies.”
  • Meta Tags: Meta tags are website code that is invisible to users, and in SEO specifically refers to the Keywords and Description tags, which are designed to help search engines better understand and explain to users what a website is about. See the article What is a Meta Tag? for more.
  • Organic Search Results: The word “organic” refers to search traffic that is not paid for with an advertising campaign, but rather searches that come up normally as a result of the search engine’s algorithm. See the Ecreative IM article What are Organic Search Results? for more.
  • Pageviews: A measure of traffic on your website. Every time a page is viewed, that is considered a pageview. If the same person loads a page 8 times, that would count as 8 pageviews. Also referred to as hits.
  • PPC: Pay per Click. A term used in paid search engine advertising referring to purchasing ads for certain keywords. PPC campaigns pay every time an ad is clicked.
  • PR: Google Page Rank. Page Rank is Google’s way of assigning a number to the relative authority of a site. Sites are assigned a Page Rank of 0 – 10 by Google, and a high Page Rank implies that Google views that site as more authoritative. The primary variables in how Google assigns Page Rank are the number of relevant links pointing to a site, and the Page Rank of those sites that are linking in — though many other variables are also considered. Page Rank isnot, in any way, an indication of the ability of a site to rank well in Google’s search engine results.
  • Reciprocal Link: Also known as a link exchange, a reciprocal link is a link that is posted to another website in exchange for that website posting a link to your site. You scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours.
  • RFQ: Request for Quote. A common way of tracking conversions on a B2B website is the request for quote form. The assumption is that if a users interest has been piqued enough by the content of the website and the call for action succeeded in getting the user to contact the company for pricing. At this point the website has done it’s job, and it’s now up to the sales team.
  • Sandbox or Google Sandbox: reference to the period during which Google lowers the rankings of a brand new site. See full details in our Google Sandbox Effect article.
  • SEO: Search Engine Optimization: the ongoing process of changing the content and code of a website, as well as its interaction with other websites, to increase the likelihood that it will rank well in search engine results. See the SEO Basics article, What is SEO?
  • SEM: Search Engine Marketing. A broader term of gaining search engine traffic to a website combining both SEO and PPC techniques.
  • SERP: Search Engine Results Page. When a user searches for something in a search engine, the pages listing websites related to that search is the search engine results page.
  • Sitemap: A file on your website primarily intended for search engines, that informs the search engines where to find all the pages of your site that the search engine should be aware of, so that they can show up on the search engine results page. Sitemaps are usually a XML file.

ALT: Alternative Text Attribute

Sometimes referred to as alternative text or alt attribute, an alt tag is used within the HTML coding of a webpage to give a text description to text images. This is useful for those who cannot see the images in their browser and will usually appear when the mouse hovers over an image. It also helps from an SEO perspective by giving search engine crawlers an idea of what the image is about—think of it as a caption for Google’s spiders.

CAPTCHA: Completely Automated Public Turing Test to Tell Computers and Humans Apart

A spam tool that makes commenters prove they are human and not a spam software or computer program. These usually consist of an extra step before a comment is submitted that takes the form of entering the key from a distorted image of numbers and letters.

CMS: Content Management System

CMS, like WordPress and Drupal, is a platform that allows for publishing, editing, and modifying webpages within a website. They are great for blog and website managers who do not have vast knowledge and experience with maintaining a traditional HTML (more on that later) site.

CRO: Conversion Rate Optimization

Conversion rate optimization is the process of making changes to your ads, marketing strategies, or website with the goal of turning more viewers or visitors into conversions. What constitutes a “conversion” varies from company to company.

CTA: Call to Action

A CTA is an image or line of text that prompts a reader or visitor to take your desired action. This can range from clicking a button, signing up for a newsletter, visiting a different link, and more.

CTR: Click Through Rate

A measurement of performance determined by dividing the number of clicks received by the number of impressions received. CTR is tied to keywords, search results, and PPC ads. For example, if someone searches for “Maryland HVAC companies” and they see an ad titled, “New York HVAC Companies,” it is highly unlikely that they will click the (seemingly) irrelevant ad. The PPC advertiser displaying the NY ad for a MD search is going to have a very low CTR associated with his or her ad (because the ad is receiving impressions, but it is not attracting clicks).

HTML: Hypertext Markup Language

HTML is the “markup language” that is used to create and format webpages and websites. It allows browsers to understand what a website should look like.

LPO: Landing Page Optimization

Landing page optimization is a broader form of CRO that focuses on improving the performance of a landing page in terms of visits, conversions, and sales.

LSEO: Local Search Engine Optimization

Local SEO is the process of optimizing your website for local search results, increasing your site’s visibility for geographically related or targeted searches.

NAP: Name Address Phone Number

NAP stands for name, address, and phone number and is critical for businesses hoping to rank well for LSEO (Local SEO from above, remember?). Google pulls the NAP listings from many online directories, sources, and citations when determining which companies to list for geo-specific searches. Consistent NAP is crucial.

PPC: Pay-Per-Click

Advertisers (meaning business owners and other companies) bid on keywords for paid search results and pay a fee every time an ad is clicked be a searcher. PPC is complementary (not cannibalizing) to SEO (more on that later) efforts.

PR: PageRank

PageRank is an algorithm used by Google to rank websites in their SERPs. According to Google, PageRank is determined by counting the number and quality of links to a page to determine the importance and value of that website (under the assumption that more links to a webpage signals more importance and authority).

ROI: Return on Investment

ROI is the amount you make from a given marketing effort (PPC, SEO, direct mailer, etc.) compared to the amount spent on that effort. The higher your ROI, the more successful that marketing effort.

SE: Search Engine

A search engine is an online tool that is used for navigational, informational, or transactions searches to find other webpages. The top players in the search engine market are Google and Bing.

SEM: Search Engine Marketing

Search engine marketing encompasses all methods that attempt to increase a website’s online presence and search engine real estate—including SEO (more on that later) and PPC campaigns.

SEO: Search Engine Optimization

The process of changing your website’s code, structure, on-page, and off-page content in a way that allows search engines to more easily find, index, and rank your site on a SERP (more on that later) relative to competitors. SEO is typically thought of as an organic or unpaid search engine marketing strategy.

SERP: Search Engine Results Page

The SERP is the listings provided by Google or another search engine for a given search term or phrase. Now, SERP can include organic, paid, local, mapped, and image listings to better provide the searcher with exactly they are looking for.

URL: Uniform Resource Locator

Mostly known as a URL, this acronym basically means a web address. It is a string of characters that lets your computer know where to go on the server to find that specific webpage.

UX: User Experience

From an online marketing standpoint, UX is how a user interacts with and experiences your website. Does it take a long time to load the page? Are they are to navigate through your site? Do they find the information from the body copy as suggested within the headings?

API (Application Programming Interface) is a set of rules that programs use in order to communicate with each other. A prime example is Google Analytics’ API which allows other programs to communicate with Google Analytics to pull data from Analytics directly. No need to copy and paste repeatedly.

ASP.NET is a program that runs insidee IIS which allows web programmers to build dynamic websites on Microsoft servers. This server side scripting technology is endemic to Microsoft servers and is the next generation of ASP, though not backwards compatible.

ASP, which stands for Active Server Pages, is Microsoft’s first server-side scripting engine which allows dynamic web page creation. It is the predecessor to ASP.NET and like ASP.NET runs on Windows-based platforms. Unfortunately, some file types cannot be read by Microsoft servers (unlike Linux servers), and without the proper filters installed, can render certain files (like .kml files) unreadable.

B2B is just a shortened way of saying Business-to-Business, describing a company as one that works with other businesses as opposed to directly with consumers (retail).

B2C, just like B2B, is just a shortened way of saying Business-to-Consumer (though some say Business-to-Customer, however this can be misleading as another business [B2B] could constitute as being a customer). This is often used synonymously with “retail”.

CFML stands for ColdFusion Markup Language and is a scripting language that is commonly seen running on .NET framework, and therefore, is often associated with sites on Microsoft servers.

CMS, or Content Management System, is exactly what its name implies…a system that helps manage content. CMSs for websites are incredibly important because they can help make the creation and management of content quicker and easier. Some of the most popular CMSs are WordPress, Drupal and Joomla, though others like Magento and AmeriCommerce are popular for e-commerce sites.

CPA (Cost per Action, not to be confused with Cost per Acquisition which is used more in affiliate marketing) is an online advertisement pricing model that charges the advertiser when a specific action is taken in response to the advertisement. This could be anything from making a purchase, filling out a form, and so on. The acronym Cost Per Conversion is sometimes used synonymously with this, depending on the how one defines a conversion.

CPC, or Cost Per Click, is also an online advertisement pricing model that charges the advertiser when an ad is clicked upon.  Google’s AdWords and Microsoft’s adCenter are popular examples of CPC models in effect. For Cost Per Conversion, please see Cost Per Action.

CPI stands for Cost Per Impression and is an online advertising model often calculated in units of a thousand, thus the reason it is often called CPM (“m” standing for “milli” – Latin for one thousandth). This model is often used with banner ads and text link ads where an impression represents each appearance of the ad.

CRO, or Conversion Rate Optimization (sometimes just called Conversion Optimization), is the optimization of a website or landing page with the intent of maximizing the greatest number of conversions. An extension from just Search Engine Optimization (SEO), Conversion Rate Optimization goes a step farther by trying to aim for more conversions that just rankings in the SERPS.

CSS which stands for Cascading Style Sheets often refers to the external files that contain CSS code (though you could include this within your page’s HTML code, such embedding CSS or inlining CSS) but it can also refer to the language used in the coding itself. The CSS code instructs the browser on some of the formatting for the content on your site in a more condensed, (hopefully) organized fashion. The rules can be utilized to provide consistent formatting for elements on a page which you can apply across your entire site (if you reference the same code, of course). Keep in mind that the CSS only controls the formatting and not the actual content itself. For instance, if you want to include a drop down menu that expands when you hover over it, the content (text, HTML code, etc.) needs to already be generated on the page (this is where JavaScript and PHP are sometimes utilized), the CSS rules just tell the browser how to display the content (not displaying it until you hover over it, and then displaying it with the formatting that is specified within the CSS rules when you do hover over it). Some people may erroneously refer to making changes with/to CSS to modify the content on your site but just remember, the CSS just controls the formatting/appearance, it doesn’t add the code to the HTML code. Thanks for the suggestion Patrick!

CTR, or Click Through Rate, is a measurement of an online advertisement campaign’s success. It is the percentage of how many people click on an ad, divided by the number of times the ad is shown (impressions).

DNS aka Domain Name System is a naming system used throughout the internet to translate IP addresses into human-friendly domain names. Without it, we would be referring to websites not by their domain name like www.facebook.com but by numerical values like 69.63.176.11.

FTP, or File Transfer Protocol, is a network protocol used to transfer files between hosts, or in many cases, files on your web developer’s computer to the website’s server. Popular FTP Clients, like FileZilla, allow you to transfer files between your computer and your website’s server, making it quicker and easier than having to go though your host’s File Manager.

GUI, or Graphical User Interface, is an interface that gives users the ability to interact with computers or other devices through graphical elements (like images) instead of text commands. This not only makes it easier for those of us that are programming-challenged, but since it cuts down the need for text commands, it saves time (and keyboard wear and tear).

H1 refers to the main heading tag in HTML. The 1 indicates that it is the highest level, with each subsequent heading taking on a higher number. Though h1 headings are often regarded as an aesthetic concern to websites, it can also be a good place to put a keyword you are targeting.

HTML, or HyperText Markup Language, is one of the most common markup languages used on webpages. HTML elements are the building blocks of most webpages and give web designers and developers the ability to manipulate the appearance of text-based content.

IIS (Internet Information Services), also known as Internet Information Server, is a web server application created by Microsoft. It is second to its main competitor in the web server market: Apache HTTP Server.

KML, or Keyhole Markup Language, is a programming language used in map overlays and in Earth browsers like Google Earth. KML files allow you to specify different points on a map overlay, such as markers for store locations, and therefore, is a helpful tool for local search optimization.

KPI, Key Performance Indicators though sometimes just called Performance Indicators, are a type of measurement for success of an activity like an internet marketing campaign. These can vary, but in the internet marketing realm, this can be defined (on a case-by-case basis) as the number of new visitors to a site, the bounce rate of a site, the number of exits, average time on site, etc.

OS (Operating Systems) in a nutshell, are the systems in which computer hardware can communicate with software. Common OSs include Windows, Linux, iOS and Mac OS X. Most web servers run on Linux rather than Windows servers in contradiction to most personal computers which more often run on a version of Windows.

PPC is an advertising model where an advertiser pays for each click of their ad.Cost Per Click is the reference to the amount that each click is worth (directed towards the advertiser) though the CPC is dependent upon what type of PPC model is used: fixed or bid-based.

PR, or Page Rank, is an algorithm used by Google that is used to measure the importance of a site. Contrary to some belief, the word Page is actually derived from its creator, Larry Page, and not in reference to a web page. Though often used by many people as a KPI, Page Rank has shown to be vulnerable to manipulation and therefore not an entirely accurate portrayal of a site’s status. Also, it tends to favor older sites, so new sites often have lower PRs.

ROI (Return On Investment), is an important measurement to determine the effectiveness of a given investment, such as an Internet Marketing campaign. Essentially, anyone spending money in order to make money (like a business) will eventually want to know how much of their money they got back at the end of the proverbial day.

RSS which stands for Really Simple Syndication is a type of web feed format that is commonly used for blogs and news sites to allow them to syndicate their content (really) simply. Subscribers using an RSS reader can access the information in the feed that is structured in a layout that is easier to read.

SEM is a broad form of search engine-specific marketing which encompasses a variety of other internet marketing strategies such as Search Engine Optimization (SEO), paid inclusion and contextual advertising. Search Engine Marketing is often used to refer to the combination of organic SEO and paid search engine advertising.

SEO (Search Engine Optimization) is the process of improving a website’s visibility in a search engine. This can be done in a number of ways, but is often targeted around keywords. Since there are many ways in which SEO is accomplished, I will spare you the details, but know that this is often in reference to achieving better organic (un-paid) rankings in the SERPs.

SERPs (Search Engine Results Pages) are basically the listing pages that appear each time you search for something in a search engine. Since most people do not search past the third or fourth search engine results pages, it is most desirable to maintain a ranking for targeted keywords within the first page, or roughly, the top 10 results.

SMM, or Social Media Marketing, encompasses a variety of channels including popular social media outlets like Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube (just to name a few). Since user engagement is a great branding strategy, as well as a useful way to get insight from customers to improve services, social media has become a relatively inexpensive, yet valuable tool for any company with an online presence … as long as it doesn’t steer in the wrong direction like the infamous Chrysler tweet incident.

TLD (Top Level Domains) are the highest level domains found in the Domain Naming System such as .com, .org  and .net. Though there has been much debate as to the authority that a .com domain has over a .net, this myth has pretty much been busted (sorry, Jaime and Adam, maybe you can bust an SEO myth some other day). However, some TLDs, like .edu, .gov and .mil are believed to carry more weight since they represent authoritative sources like educational institutions, government and military websites (respectively).

UGC (or User Generated Content) refers to content is somewhat self-explanatory (once you know what the “UGC” stands for). It refers to content that is user-generated. Though this is a very broad explanation, some examples of user-generated content are websites like Yelp which rely upon its users to write content (reviews) about the businesses that are listed on their site. Comments, like the one that Cloe provided below (which in a wonderful way made this acronym addition possible), is another example of user-generated content. Technically, the search engines like Google, Bing and Yahoo! are using user-generated content to fill their indices (it just happens to be the website admins who are generating and pushing their content into their respective indices). Using UGC is a great way to not only add a human element to your pages’ content but it can sometimes signal that the page has been recently edited, which Google may give greater emphasis to fresher web content (something that became an increasingly sought-after approach to SEO following Google’s Freshness Update). Social networks like Facebook, Twitter and StumbleUpon also depend on user-generated content and with social signals also having a positive correlation with ranking, it makes sense to integrate your social media marketing efforts with your SEO strategy as well. Thanks Cloe for the awesome suggestion!

URLs (Uniform Resource Locator) are the addresses for web pages. URL structure is important for SEO not only for crawlability but also for providing search engines the correct address for a given web page. If a URL is spelled incorrectly, it will produce a 404 error which is not something you want to send your site’s visitor to. Also, Google (amongst other popular search engines) often handles static URLs better than dynamic ones, so having the right URL structure can be important for indexing and subsequently, ranking purposes.

W3C is the World Wide Web Consortium which is a standards organization in charge of developing the protocols, guidelines and standards for the web. Their role as a figurative hall monitor has helped to shape compatibility across the internet, thereby reducing issues of inconsistency in the display of web pages. Really, they’re more like the fashion police since most of their “policing” is done through setting specific guidelines (not usually enforced, but considered good to comply with) and not by going door to door cracking down on “coding criminals”.

WP (WordPress) is one of the most popular Content Management Systems for the web. However, there tends to be some slight confusion between WordPress.com and WordPress.org. WordPress.com provides a free WordPress hosted blogging platform, whereas WordPress.org is the site where you can download open source CMS templates to be used for your website. Having a relatively easy-to-use interface, WordPress sites are some of the easiest to use CMSs for the computer-programming challenged, though even the most advanced of HTML experts can benefit from the time saving tools that WordPress has, like WYSIWYG editors and category management.

WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) refers to a user interface that provides an end-result preview of a document while you are creating it. A WYSIWYG editor, which is employed in many blogging platforms and CMSs, gives the interactivity of a document editing program like Microsoft Word, whilst simultaneously adding the necessary coding to achieve the desired formatting

 

A

AS Article Submission
API Application Program Interface

B

B2B Business to Business
B2C Business to Consumer

C

CPC Cost Per Click
CTR Click Through Rate
CTA Content Targeted Advertising
CTA Call to Action
CPM Cost Per Thousands
CPA Cost Per Action
CPA Cost Per Acquisition
CPL Cost Per Lead
CPO Cost Per Order
CRO Conversion Rate Optimization
CGI Common Gateway Interface
CMS Content Management System
CSS Cascading Style Sheets
CSE Comparison Shopping Engine or Custom Search Engine (Google)
CPV Cost Per View
CVN Card Verification Number
COA Cost of Acquisition
CPW Cost-per-view (CPV)

D

DS Directory Submission
DC Data Center
DLR Deep Link Ratio
DKI Dynamic Keyword Insertion
DLP Directory Listings Page
DNS Domain Name Server
DMCA Digital Millennium Copyright Act
DMOZ Directory – Mozilla
DFO Data Feed Optimization
DRPs Directory Results Pages
DSRP Directory Search Results Page
DMM Digital Media Marketing

E

EMD Exact Match Domain
ECPC Enhanced Cost Per Click
ECPC Enhanced CPC

F

FFA Free For All Pages
FCP Frequently Cached Page

G

G+ Google Plus
GIS Google Image Search
GIY Google It Yourself
GAS Guaranteed Article Submission
GDS Guaranteed Directory Submission
GAP Google Advertising Professional
GWT Google Webmaster Tools
GYM Google Yahoo MSN

H

HTML Hypertext Markup Language
HTTP HyperText Transfer Protocol
HTTPS Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure

I

IM Internet Marketing
IP Internet Protocol (Address)
IDF Inverse Document Frequency
IBL In Bound Links
ISP Internet Service Providers
IYP Internet Yellow Pages

J

JGI Just Google It

K

KDA Keyword Density Analyzer
KEI Keyword Effectiveness Index

L

LB Link Building
LSA Latent Semantic Analysis
LSI Latent Semantic Indexing
LPO Landing Page Optimization

M

MTO Meta Tags Optimization
MCP Moderately Cached Page
MFA Made For Advertising

N

NSEO Negative SEO

O

OBL OutBound Link
OWBL One Way Back Link
ODP Open Directory Project
ORM Online Reputation Management
OSE Open Site Explorer

P

PR Page Rank
PPC Pay Per Click
PHP PHP Hypertext Preprocessor
PDF Portable Document Format
PFI Pay For Inclusion
PFL Paid For Listings
P4P Paid For Placement
PPR Pay Per Rank
PPV Pay Per Visitor
PPP Pay Per Post

Q

R

ROI Return on Investment
RI Regular Index
RSS Really Simple Syndication or Rich Site Summary
RTL Regional Long Tail
RTB Real Time Bidding
PFP Pay for Performance

S

SE Search Engine
SB Social Bookmarking
SI Supplemental Index
SEO Search Engine Optimization
SEOs Search Engine Optimizers
SEOs Search Engine Optimization Performance
SEM Search Engine Marketing
SEP Search Engine Poisoning
SER Search Engine Ranking
SMO Social Media Optimization
SMM Social Media Marketing
SMB Small and Medium Businesses
SMEs Small And Medium-Sized Enterprises
SES Search Engine Strategies
SERM Search Engine Results Management
STW Search The Web
SERP Search Engine Results Page
SRM Search Reputation Management
SSI Server Side Includes
SEW Search Engine Watch
SEP Search Engine Positioning
SMX Search Marketing Expo
SNS Social Networking Service
SWL SiteWide Link
SEMPO Search Engine Marketing Professional Organization

T

TLP Top Level Page
TLA Text Link Ads
TBPR Toolbar PageRank
TR Trust Rank
TSETSB The Search Engine That Spam Built

U

URL Uniform Resource Locator
UGC User Generated Content
UX User Experience

V

VS Video Submission
VIPS Visual-block Page Segmentation

W

W3C World Wide Web Consortium
WMW Webmaster World
X

XML Extensible Markup Language
XHTML Extensible HyperText Markup Language

C

  • Cached Pages; Pages that are currently in RAM, this can be a nuisance when trying to view live page alterations.
  • CPC: Cost-Per-Click
  • CTR: Click-Through-Rate
  • CMS: Content Management System (WordPress, Concrete5, Joomla, etc.)
  • CTA: Content Targeted Advertising (Call-To-Action)
  • CPL: Cost-Per-Lead
  • CRO: Conversion Rate Optimization
  • CSS: Cascading Style Sheets
  • CPV: Cost-Per-View

D

  • Deep Link Ratio
  • DNS: Domain Name System (AKA Domain Name Server)
  • DC: Data Center

E

  • EMD:  Exact Match Domain
  • ECPC: Enhanced Cost-Per-Click

F

  • FTP: File Transfer Protocol

H

  • HTML: Hypertext Markup Language
  • HTTP: HyperText Transfer Protocol
  • HTTPS or HTTP Secure: Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure

I

  • IP: Internet Protocol
  • ISP: Internet Service Provider

K

  • Keyword Analyst (Keyword Campaign)
  • Keyword Stuffing: Something you should avoid when implementing proper SEO; instead use organic long tail keywords.

L

  • Long Tail Keywords: Essentially any key phrase over two words in length, the goal is to match natural speech with short tail keywords.
  • Link Building: If you want backlinks then create organic content that users will want to naturally link to.

M

  • Metadata: Is data that describes data. In reference to SEO this would be what you alter to assist in on and off page optimization.
  • Meta Tag Optimization: The basically just keep this within 140 characters including spaces. Keep in mind that a good SEO uses a pattern of keywords throughout the entire page’s Metadata.
  • Metadata Optimization: This is more or less the same as on-page optimization.

O

  • Organic Keywords: Keywords that are created with users as well as Google’s algorithm in mind.
  • ODP: Open Directory Project, a tool created by MOZ that allows you to check your website’s backlink profile.
  • On-Page Optimization: This would include metadata optimization; title tags, Meta descriptions, alt tags, etc.
  • Off-Page Optimization: This is usually in most cases in reference to backlinking but it also includes; web 2.0 properties, sitemaps, etc.

P

  • PR: PageRank
  • PPC: Pay-Per-Click
  • PDF: Portable Document Format

R

  • RAM: Random-Access Memory
  • rel=”nofollow” (Link relation) used to prevent the passing of PageRank.
  • rel=”noindex” (Link relation) used to quickly advise robots not to index a particular page.
  • RM: Reputation Management
  • ROI: Return on Investment
  • RSS: Really Simple Syndication

S

  • Search Engines
  • Subdirectories
  • Short Tail Keywords: Basically any key phrase two words in length or less.
  • SEO: Search Engine Optimization
  • SEM: Search Engine Marketing
  • SMO: Social Media Optimization
  • SMM: Social Media Marketing
  • SES: Search Engine Strategies
  • SEP: Search Engine Poisoning
  • SERM: Search Engine Results Management
  • SERP: Search Engine Results Page
  • SWL: SiteWide Link

T

  • Title Tag Optimization: The main point is to keep this within 70 characters including spaces. Google will ignore anything after the 70thcharacter; keep in mind that special characters do tend to take more space. For example the “&” is read as & when the page is crawled.
  • TLD: Top Level Domain
  • Trust Rank: A similar process to PageRank except it’s from Yahoo.

U

  • URL: Uniform Resource Locator
  • UGC: User Generated Content

 

301 Redirect – redirecting one URL to another while preserving current rankings.

Algorithm – rules the search engine spiders follow to index information. Each search engine uses their own algorithms.

Black Hat SEO – unethical techniques used to gain ranking in search engines. The search engines filter for such techniques and you may get banned from displaying in search engine results.

Click Fraud – act of purposely clicking on competitor’s sponsored ads without really wanting to buy something from the site. The search engines have improved ways to detect and prevent this from interfering with your account. You will not be charged for clicks that seem to be fraudulent.

Content match – in paid placement, if you decide to do content match it means that your ads will show up in other related articles and websites that the search engines are partnered with.
KEI ( Keyword Effectiveness Index ) – measurement of the effectiveness of a keyword for natural ranking. This is based on search frequency and competition of the keyword.
Keyword Stuffing – attempt to get a higher ranking in the search engines by repeating keywords more than necessary. This is considered Black Hat SEO.

Landing Page – pages that users click through to from the sponsored ads. Specially made for a particular product or service focusing on one topic related to marketing an idea or product.

Link Popularity – measurement of inbound links to a web site. www.marketleap.com is a good tool to use.

Meta Description Tag – HTML head tag that tells the search engines what the page is about. Search engines may use this for your SERP description.

Meta Keywords Tag – relevant keywords to the web page, also a HTML tag that tells the search engines what keywords are associated with the page.

Meta Tags – part of the HTML that tells the search engine spiders what the web page is referencing.
Text Link – a word used as a hyperlink. Also known as anchor link. Usually linking to a page with more specific information about that word/topic.

Title Tags – defines the title of the web page; tells the search engine spider what the page is about. This is also an HTML tag.

=======================

ACPC = Average cost per click

AIDA – Attention, Interest, Desire, Action

CLV – Customer lifetime value

CMS – Content management system

CPA – Cost per acquisition / action

CPL – Cost per lead

CPV – Cost per view (see also PPV)

CR – Conversion rate

CRO – Conversion rate optimisation

CTA – Call to action

CX – Customer experience

DM – Direct mail (or ‘Direct message’, in Twitter circles)

DMP – Data management platform

DR – Direct response

DSP – Demand-side platform

EPC – Earnings per click

EPM – Earnings per thousand

ESP – Email service provider

FBML – Facebook Markup Language

Greybarred – Banned from Google

HIPPO – Highest paid person’s opinion

HTTPS – Hyper Text Transfer Protocol Secure

IMAP – Internet Message Access Protocol

MCPC = Max cost per click

MNCPC = Minimum cost per click

PPL – Pay per lead

PPV – Pay per view

RFI – Request for information

ROI = Return On Investment (What you make {R} / what you spend {I})

ROAS = Return On Advertiser Spending

RFP – Request for proposal

RSS – Really Simple Syndication

RT – Retweet

RTB – Real time bidding

RTD – Real time data

SES = Search Engine Strategies

S2S – Server to server

SaaS – Software as a service

SMP – Social media platform

SMO (Social Media Optimization)

SOV – Share of voice

SOW – Statement of work

SSL – Secure Sockets Layer

SWOT – Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats

UGC – User-generated content

USP – Unique selling proposition

UV – Unique visitor

UX – User experience

VOD – Video on demand

WOMM – Word of mouth marketing

Web usability: An assessment and measurement of a website’s ease of use. Usability involves elements of web design and site architecture and functionality

social media optimization: Optimizing all aspects of social media marketing
Abbreviation: SMO

IBL In-bound Link
OBL Out-bound Link
======================

ACPC = Average cost per click

AIDA – Attention, Interest, Desire, Action

CLV – Customer lifetime value

CMS – Content management system

CPA – Cost per acquisition / action

CPL – Cost per lead

CPV – Cost per view (see also PPV)

CR – Conversion rate

CRO – Conversion rate optimisation

CTA – Call to action

CX – Customer experience

DM – Direct mail (or ‘Direct message’, in Twitter circles)

DMP – Data management platform

DR – Direct response

DSP – Demand-side platform

EPC – Earnings per click

EPM – Earnings per thousand

ESP – Email service provider

FBML – Facebook Markup Language

Greybarred – Banned from Google

HIPPO – Highest paid person’s opinion

HTTPS – Hyper Text Transfer Protocol Secure

IMAP – Internet Message Access Protocol

MCPC = Max cost per click

MNCPC = Minimum cost per click

PPL – Pay per lead

PPV – Pay per view

RFI – Request for information

ROI = Return On Investment (What you make {R} / what you spend {I})

ROAS = Return On Advertiser Spending

RFP – Request for proposal

RSS – Really Simple Syndication

RT – Retweet

RTB – Real time bidding

RTD – Real time data

SES = Search Engine Strategies

S2S – Server to server

SaaS – Software as a service

SMP – Social media platform

SMO (Social Media Optimization)

SOV – Share of voice

SOW – Statement of work

SSL – Secure Sockets Layer

SWOT – Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats

UGC – User-generated content

USP – Unique selling proposition

UV – Unique visitor

UX – User experience

VOD – Video on demand

WOMM – Word of mouth marketing

Web usability: An assessment and measurement of a website’s ease of use. Usability involves elements of web design and site architecture and functionality

social media optimization: Optimizing all aspects of social media marketing
Abbreviation: SMO

IBL In-bound Link
OBL Out-bound Link

Anchor Text : Anchor text refers to the visible text for a hyperlink. For example:

< a href=”http://www.seo-help.com/” >This is the anchor text< /a >
Cloaking Cloaking describes the technique of serving a different page to a search engine spider than what a human visitor sees. This technique is abused by spammers for keyword stuffing. Cloaking is a violation of the Terms Of Service of most search engines and could be grounds for banning.
FFA Abbreviation for Free For All. FFA sites post large lists of unrelated links to anyone and everyone. FFA sites and the links they provide are basically useless. Humans do not use them and search engines minimize their importance in ranking formulas.
Gateway Page Also called a doorway page. A gateway page exists solely for the purpose of driving traffic to another page. They are usually designed and optimized to target one specific keyphrase. Gateway pages rarely are written for human visitors. They are written for search engines to achieve high rankings and hopefully drive traffic to the main site. Using gateway pages is a violation of the Terms Of Service of most search engines and could be grounds for banning.
Google Dance Up to June, 2003, Google has updated the index for their search engine on a roughly monthly basis. While the update is in progress, search results for each of Google’s nine datacenters are different. The positions of a site appears to “dance” as it fluctuates minute to minute. “Google dance” is an unofficial term coined to refer to the period when Google is performing the update to its index. Google may be changing their index calculation method to allow for a continuous update (which will effectively end the roughly monthly dances).
Keyword stuffing refers to the practice of adding superfluous keywords to a web page. The words are added for the ‘benefit’ of search engines and not human visitors. The words may or may not be visible to human visitors. While not necessarily a violation of search engine Terms of Service, at least when the words are visible to humans, it detracts from the impact of a page (it looks like spam). It is also possible that search engines may discount the importance of large blocks of text that do not conform to grammatical structures (ie. lists of disconnected keywords). There is no valid reason for engaging in this practice.
Link Farm A link farm is a group of separate, highly interlinked websites for the purposes of inflating link popularity (or PR). Engaging in a link farm is a violation of the Terms Of Service of most search engines and could be grounds for banning.
PFI Abbreviation for Pay For Inclusion. Many search engines offer a PFI program to assure frequent spidering / indexing of a site (or page). PFI does not guarantee that a site will be ranked highly (or at all) for a given search term. It just offers webmasters the opportunity to quickly incorporate changes to a site into a search engine’s index. This can be useful for experimenting with tweaking a site and judging the resultant effects on the rankings.
Splash Page Splash pages are introduction pages to a web site that are heavy on graphics (or flash video) with no textual content. They are designed to either impress a visitor or complement some corporate branding.

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24. February 2015 · Enter your password to view comments. · Categories: Econ, I.T.

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24. February 2015 · Enter your password to view comments. · Categories: Econ, I.T.

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19. February 2015 · Enter your password to view comments. · Categories: Econ, I.T.

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M-am văzut pus în câteva situații în care a trebuit să precizez că nu sunt blogger (excribiționist), iată câteva detalii:

1. Nu fac reclamă la nici un produs, nu vând nimic la nimeni, nu trăiesc nici de o bere/suc/1 leu din blog.
2. Scriu pe WEB, pe site-ul meu, pe site-ul propriu din anul de grație 2000, dinainte de apariția ”ciupercuțelor” pe nume blogger în România, de ”bloggeri” s-a auzit ca specie în România după 2005,
3. Am făcut o facultate serioasă, de stat, cu 5 candidați pe loc, cel mai tânăr student din an (împlineam 18 ani în ziua admiterii la facultate)
4. Scriu de plăcere, artistic, pentru mine, ca un jurnal propriu, nu pentru celebritate sau audiență, la fel ca marchizul de Sade, așa că nu îmi pasă DELOC dacă citește cineva asta acum:)
5. Nu Îmi fac cumetrie cu alți bloggeri ca să îmi fac lobby sau P.R. , mă dezic de orice fel de formă de a exista specifică bloggerilor
6. Am 18 ani de când mănânc pâine numai din Internet, sunt un specialist Internet pursânge, nu un amator / lipitoare / pișcotar
7. Dacă există o specie de slujbaș care lucrează în industria Internet pe care nu o agreez este cea de blogger

Numai bine tuturor!

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SEO redirect pagina spre landing page păstrare link

SEO redirect pagina spre landing page păstrare link

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